Asking someone to come out with you

R: Hi! you’re listening to Proofessors school of English slang with Rick and Michelle. Please listen to this dialogue.

R: Alrite Michelle, are you up for football this Saturday

M: Where’s it at Rick?

R: It’s at Ruislip sports centre. 10 to 12. M: Yeah i’ll be down
R: Cool, can you give John a bell and see if he wants to come

M: No problem mate, I’m gonna give Paul a ring as well and tell him to get his ass down

R: Don’t mate, I can’t stand the bloke

M: Why

R: He pisses me off

R: Okay you can probably tell from the overall Dialogue that Rick is inviting Michelle to play football on Saturday. However, there is a lot of slang that both use which you may not understand.

M: Rick asked Michelle “are you up for football on Saturday”. The word “up” in this sentence has changed its meaning. Here, it means ‘want’. If he was saying it formally he would say do you want to play football on Saturday.

R: You can you use are you up for most things. For example, are you up for taking a train there? Are you up for chicken for lunch? Are you up for punching Michelle’s head in is a good example.

M: Oh. are you up for shutting up?, it’s my turn… It’s interesting that you can also use different slang to mean the exact same thing. Are you down for football on Saturday? This means exactly the same thing as are you up for this.

R: It is very strange that on their own, the words “up” and “down” are opposites. But here they really do have the same meaning.

M: When Rick tells me about the football, I say “where’s it at.” This is slang for “where is it located”. If you are on the phone to somebody and you want to know where they are, you can say where you at. Then they should tell you their location.

R: When asked about the football, Michelle says “I will be down.” This is slang for I will be there. So if someone says are you coming to the restaurant tonight, you can say yes I will be down. If you want to be formal however, you would say
I will be there, or I will come.

M: Rick tells me to give John a bell. Now this doesn’t mean literally hand John a bell. Give John a bell is actually slang for telephone john.

R: There’s actually a lot of slang for making a telephone call. I can say give me a telephone call later. Or phone me later. Give me a ring later. Give me a bell later. All of these may be used by your English friends.

M: There are many more words for phone but even I don’t know them all. R: That’s no surprise Michelle; you never answer your phone.
M: Well I’ve been busy.

M: You will notice that I tell him to get his ass down here. Never use such slang in a formal environment but friends use it a lot. It just means to tell him to
come along. If I say for example get your ass down to the meeting on Monday, it
just means you should come to the meeting on Monday. But in a cool way. If I
say get your ass down here, it just means come here.

R: In the dialogue I say “I can’t stand the bloke”. In this sentence there are two bits of slang. Firstly bloke just means man. You can also say guy instead man. When I say I can’t stand him, it means I do not like or I hate that man.
Although it doesn’t have to be this strong, it normally means you find someone
or something very annoying. I can’t stand that woman. This literally means I
can’t put up with that woman; she is really annoying or irritating.

M: Let’s try a different example. If something is very annoying like maybe you are trying to sleep and there is a leaking tap. So you just hear the sound, drip, drip, drip, over and over again. You will put up with it for a while but soon you will say, “I can’t stand it anymore”, or “I can’t take it anymore”.

R: Or I can’t stand Michelle’s voice anymore.

M: I can’t stand yours mate. You have a stupid voice. R: Alrite calm down Michelle come on.
M: When asked why he can’t stand him. Rick says “he pisses me off”. This basically means that he makes rick angry, or he doesn’t like him. This is a rude way of saying that he makes me angry and you should only use it with friends.

R: Other more polite ways to say the same thing. Include:

– He makes me mad
– He annoys me
– Or He makes my blood boil

R: Hopefully today you have learnt some new English street language which you can use with your English friends. If you have any more questions please feel free to email at podcasts@proofessor.co.uk. Also if you want us to cover any other topic then please feel to email us. You can also check a written version of this podcast on our website.

R: Take care

M:Bye

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

For more podcasts about English slang please click here

These podcasts are designed for international students, so that they can be exposed to the way that local English people speak.

If you want to give me any feedback or request me to cover a particular topic please let me know via skype  (rick_proofessor) or qq (1928215946).

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Additionally we provide an excellent paraphrasing (rewriting) service that helps students to avoid plagiarism.

Your essays, dissertation, thesis and other documents are all welcome.

 

For our proofreading service click here

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From there you can click on samples of each service so that you know what to expect.

R: Hi! you’re listening to Proofessors school of English slang with Rick and Michelle. Please listen to this dialogue.

R: Alrite Michelle, are you up for football this Saturday

M: Where’s it at Rick?

R: It’s at Ruislip sports centre. 10 to 12. M: Yeah i’ll be down
R: Cool, can you give John a bell and see if he wants to come

M: No problem mate, I’m gonna give Paul a ring as well and tell him to get his ass down

R: Don’t mate, I can’t stand the bloke

M: Why

R: He pisses me off

R: Okay you can probably tell from the overall Dialogue that Rick is inviting Michelle to play football on Saturday. However, there is a lot of slang that both use which you may not understand.

M: Rick asked Michelle “are you up for football on Saturday”. The word “up” in this sentence has changed its meaning. Here, it means ‘want’. If he was saying it formally he would say do you want to play football on Saturday.

R: You can you use are you up for most things. For example, are you up for taking a train there? Are you up for chicken for lunch? Are you up for punching Michelle’s head in is a good example.

M: Oh. are you up for shutting up?, it’s my turn… It’s interesting that you can also use different slang to mean the exact same thing. Are you down for football on Saturday? This means exactly the same thing as are you up for this.

R: It is very strange that on their own, the words “up” and “down” are opposites. But here they really do have the same meaning.

M: When Rick tells me about the football, I say “where’s it at.” This is slang for “where is it located”. If you are on the phone to somebody and you want to know where they are, you can say where you at. Then they should tell you their location.

R: When asked about the football, Michelle says “I will be down.” This is slang for I will be there. So if someone says are you coming to the restaurant tonight, you can say yes I will be down. If you want to be formal however, you would say
I will be there, or I will come.

M: Rick tells me to give John a bell. Now this doesn’t mean literally hand John a bell. Give John a bell is actually slang for telephone john.

R: There’s actually a lot of slang for making a telephone call. I can say give me a telephone call later. Or phone me later. Give me a ring later. Give me a bell later. All of these may be used by your English friends.

M: There are many more words for phone but even I don’t know them all. R: That’s no surprise Michelle; you never answer your phone.
M: Well I’ve been busy.

M: You will notice that I tell him to get his ass down here. Never use such slang in a formal environment but friends use it a lot. It just means to tell him to
come along. If I say for example get your ass down to the meeting on Monday, it
just means you should come to the meeting on Monday. But in a cool way. If I
say get your ass down here, it just means come here.

R: In the dialogue I say “I can’t stand the bloke”. In this sentence there are two bits of slang. Firstly bloke just means man. You can also say guy instead man. When I say I can’t stand him, it means I do not like or I hate that man.
Although it doesn’t have to be this strong, it normally means you find someone
or something very annoying. I can’t stand that woman. This literally means I
can’t put up with that woman; she is really annoying or irritating.

M: Let’s try a different example. If something is very annoying like maybe you are trying to sleep and there is a leaking tap. So you just hear the sound, drip, drip, drip, over and over again. You will put up with it for a while but soon you will say, “I can’t stand it anymore”, or “I can’t take it anymore”.

R: Or I can’t stand Michelle’s voice anymore.

M: I can’t stand yours mate. You have a stupid voice. R: Alrite calm down Michelle come on.
M: When asked why he can’t stand him. Rick says “he pisses me off”. This basically means that he makes rick angry, or he doesn’t like him. This is a rude way of saying that he makes me angry and you should only use it with friends.

R: Other more polite ways to say the same thing. Include:

– He makes me mad
– He annoys me
– Or He makes my blood boil

R: Hopefully today you have learnt some new English street language which you can use with your English friends. If you have any more questions please feel free to email at podcasts@proofessor.co.uk. Also if you want us to cover any other topic then please feel to email us. You can also check a written version of this podcast on our website.

R: Take care

M:Bye

R: Hi! you’re listening to Proofessors school of English slang with Rick and Michelle. Please listen to this dialogue.

R: Alrite Michelle, are you up for football this Saturday

M: Where’s it at Rick?

R: It’s at Ruislip sports centre. 10 to 12. M: Yeah i’ll be down
R: Cool, can you give John a bell and see if he wants to come

M: No problem mate, I’m gonna give Paul a ring as well and tell him to get his ass down

R: Don’t mate, I can’t stand the bloke

M: Why

R: He pisses me off

R: Okay you can probably tell from the overall Dialogue that Rick is inviting Michelle to play football on Saturday. However, there is a lot of slang that both use which you may not understand.

M: Rick asked Michelle “are you up for football on Saturday”. The word “up” in this sentence has changed its meaning. Here, it means ‘want’. If he was saying it formally he would say do you want to play football on Saturday.

R: You can you use are you up for most things. For example, are you up for taking a train there? Are you up for chicken for lunch? Are you up for punching Michelle’s head in is a good example.

M: Oh. are you up for shutting up?, it’s my turn… It’s interesting that you can also use different slang to mean the exact same thing. Are you down for football on Saturday? This means exactly the same thing as are you up for this.

R: It is very strange that on their own, the words “up” and “down” are opposites. But here they really do have the same meaning.

M: When Rick tells me about the football, I say “where’s it at.” This is slang for “where is it located”. If you are on the phone to somebody and you want to know where they are, you can say where you at. Then they should tell you their location.

R: When asked about the football, Michelle says “I will be down.” This is slang for I will be there. So if someone says are you coming to the restaurant tonight, you can say yes I will be down. If you want to be formal however, you would say
I will be there, or I will come.

M: Rick tells me to give John a bell. Now this doesn’t mean literally hand John a bell. Give John a bell is actually slang for telephone john.

R: There’s actually a lot of slang for making a telephone call. I can say give me a telephone call later. Or phone me later. Give me a ring later. Give me a bell later. All of these may be used by your English friends.

M: There are many more words for phone but even I don’t know them all. R: That’s no surprise Michelle; you never answer your phone.
M: Well I’ve been busy.

M: You will notice that I tell him to get his ass down here. Never use such slang in a formal environment but friends use it a lot. It just means to tell him to
come along. If I say for example get your ass down to the meeting on Monday, it
just means you should come to the meeting on Monday. But in a cool way. If I
say get your ass down here, it just means come here.

R: In the dialogue I say “I can’t stand the bloke”. In this sentence there are two bits of slang. Firstly bloke just means man. You can also say guy instead man. When I say I can’t stand him, it means I do not like or I hate that man.
Although it doesn’t have to be this strong, it normally means you find someone
or something very annoying. I can’t stand that woman. This literally means I
can’t put up with that woman; she is really annoying or irritating.

M: Let’s try a different example. If something is very annoying like maybe you are trying to sleep and there is a leaking tap. So you just hear the sound, drip, drip, drip, over and over again. You will put up with it for a while but soon you will say, “I can’t stand it anymore”, or “I can’t take it anymore”.

R: Or I can’t stand Michelle’s voice anymore.

M: I can’t stand yours mate. You have a stupid voice. R: Alrite calm down Michelle come on.
M: When asked why he can’t stand him. Rick says “he pisses me off”. This basically means that he makes rick angry, or he doesn’t like him. This is a rude way of saying that he makes me angry and you should only use it with friends.

R: Other more polite ways to say the same thing. Include:

– He makes me mad
– He annoys me
– Or He makes my blood boil

R: Hopefully today you have learnt some new English street language which you can use with your English friends. If you have any more questions please feel free to email at podcasts@proofessor.co.uk. Also if you want us to cover any other topic then please feel to email us. You can also check a written version of this podcast on our website.

R: Take care

M:Bye

R: Hi! you’re listening to Proofessors school of English slang with Rick and Michelle. Please listen to this dialogue.

R: Alrite Michelle, are you up for football this Saturday

M: Where’s it at Rick?

R: It’s at Ruislip sports centre. 10 to 12. M: Yeah i’ll be down
R: Cool, can you give John a bell and see if he wants to come

M: No problem mate, I’m gonna give Paul a ring as well and tell him to get his ass down

R: Don’t mate, I can’t stand the bloke

M: Why

R: He pisses me off

R: Okay you can probably tell from the overall Dialogue that Rick is inviting Michelle to play football on Saturday. However, there is a lot of slang that both use which you may not understand.

M: Rick asked Michelle “are you up for football on Saturday”. The word “up” in this sentence has changed its meaning. Here, it means ‘want’. If he was saying it formally he would say do you want to play football on Saturday.

R: You can you use are you up for most things. For example, are you up for taking a train there? Are you up for chicken for lunch? Are you up for punching Michelle’s head in is a good example.

M: Oh. are you up for shutting up?, it’s my turn… It’s interesting that you can also use different slang to mean the exact same thing. Are you down for football on Saturday? This means exactly the same thing as are you up for this.

R: It is very strange that on their own, the words “up” and “down” are opposites. But here they really do have the same meaning.

M: When Rick tells me about the football, I say “where’s it at.” This is slang for “where is it located”. If you are on the phone to somebody and you want to know where they are, you can say where you at. Then they should tell you their location.

R: When asked about the football, Michelle says “I will be down.” This is slang for I will be there. So if someone says are you coming to the restaurant tonight, you can say yes I will be down. If you want to be formal however, you would say
I will be there, or I will come.

M: Rick tells me to give John a bell. Now this doesn’t mean literally hand John a bell. Give John a bell is actually slang for telephone john.

R: There’s actually a lot of slang for making a telephone call. I can say give me a telephone call later. Or phone me later. Give me a ring later. Give me a bell later. All of these may be used by your English friends.

M: There are many more words for phone but even I don’t know them all. R: That’s no surprise Michelle; you never answer your phone.
M: Well I’ve been busy.

M: You will notice that I tell him to get his ass down here. Never use such slang in a formal environment but friends use it a lot. It just means to tell him to
come along. If I say for example get your ass down to the meeting on Monday, it
just means you should come to the meeting on Monday. But in a cool way. If I
say get your ass down here, it just means come here.

R: In the dialogue I say “I can’t stand the bloke”. In this sentence there are two bits of slang. Firstly bloke just means man. You can also say guy instead man. When I say I can’t stand him, it means I do not like or I hate that man.
Although it doesn’t have to be this strong, it normally means you find someone
or something very annoying. I can’t stand that woman. This literally means I
can’t put up with that woman; she is really annoying or irritating.

M: Let’s try a different example. If something is very annoying like maybe you are trying to sleep and there is a leaking tap. So you just hear the sound, drip, drip, drip, over and over again. You will put up with it for a while but soon you will say, “I can’t stand it anymore”, or “I can’t take it anymore”.

R: Or I can’t stand Michelle’s voice anymore.

M: I can’t stand yours mate. You have a stupid voice. R: Alrite calm down Michelle come on.
M: When asked why he can’t stand him. Rick says “he pisses me off”. This basically means that he makes rick angry, or he doesn’t like him. This is a rude way of saying that he makes me angry and you should only use it with friends.

R: Other more polite ways to say the same thing. Include:

– He makes me mad
– He annoys me
– Or He makes my blood boil

R: Hopefully today you have learnt some new English street language which you can use with your English friends. If you have any more questions please feel free to email at podcasts@proofessor.co.uk. Also if you want us to cover any other topic then please feel to email us. You can also check a written version of this podcast on our website.

R: Take care

M:Bye